Aug
6

FBBP #128 – Scott Pilgrim & Daken: Separated at Birth?

Posted by Chris Eckert, Jamaal Thomas, Pedro Tejeda and Joseph Mastantuono on Friday, August 6th, 2010 at 03:48:32 PM

This week, we look two semi-autobiographical Young Man Coming of Age stories that came to their conclusion in July!

Wolverine Origins #50 by Daniel Way & Will Conrad (Marvel Comics)
Scott Pilgrim’s Finest Hour by Bryan Lee O’Malley (Oni Press)

We’ve talked about Scott Pilgrim before, particularly in FBBP #96. Be forewarned, we follow up on some of the discussions from that podcast, not to mention spoiling the crap out of the entire series.

There’s been less FBB talk about Daken (aka Daniel Kenneth Way), but Jamaal has been reading the book all along, and shares his thoughts on the evolution of both Da*Ken*s. We know Daken’s taken on The World, but does he Get it Together? Is this either young man’s actual Finest Hour? Find out this week!

Posted in Podcasts · Read more by Chris Eckert

8 Responses

  1. The impression I get from Scott Pilgrim is that it is a book which some people enjoy a deeper layer of while others merely enjoy it on a superficial level. I don’t know whether that frustrates some fans of the book or not.

    Sort of like that movie that you like for its message that really resonates with you, and you meet that guy who likes it for the bullets and action.

    Thanks for the podcast.

  2. I always liked that Bryan Lee O’Malley applied the tropes of Magic Realism (realistic setting and fantastic elements that talk about culture) to a Mumble-core style comic book. It reminds me of old Love and Rockets where there were fantastic elements illustrated the emotional inner life of the characters. In the geneology of “Magic Realism” comics, you have Love and Rockets in the 80s, David Clowes’ work in the 90s (especially “Like a Glove Cast in Iron”) and Bryan Lee O’Malley’s Scott Pilgrim in the ’00s.

  3. I’m not sure it’s so much that one camp enjoys Scott Pilgrim on a “deeper” level; I think some people are just so much more INVESTED in the characters. What exactly is the “deeper level” that some readers wouldn’t get? Everyone realizes that it’s a coming of age story. Everyone gets how it tries to encompass the spirit of a “generation” (of North American adult-children from a certain class level). Everyone gets the pop culture references. And everyone understands the “magical realism” dynamic, even if they don’t know the term “magical realism”. It’s all just a matter of whether certain readers rabidly CARE about this stuff to a fanatic, almost disturbing degree.

    By the way, I actually really like Scott Pilgrim and would give most of the volumes like 4.5 stars. I just don’t go for all the aimless self-important fawning that some readers are falling into. I read an article yesterday by this guy, who is over 35, writing about how nervous he was about whether the Scott Pilgrim movie was going to be good. It read like something a 14-year-old girl would write before going out on her first date or something. There isn’t MORE to Scott Pilgrim than most fans think; there’s LESS. It’s not THAT deep, and that’s actually one of its strengths.

  4. So Wolverine put Romulus in the Darkforce Dimension.

    You know who escaped the Darkforce Dimension? Silvermane.

    Heckuva job there, Danny.

    I’m waiting for the inevitable everything you know is wrong on Origins, because it’s so thinly written and sloppily constructed and thematically and subtextually barren it practically BEGS to be retconned…

  5. And I must note, I used to be a huge Daniel Way booster back in the day. There are arcs in Origins that are fantastic. But overall the thing felt like a huge waste of time.

  6. Just want to say that I also read the Young Neil/Stacey Pilgrim/Best Day of His Life scene as Neil meeting Stacey and eventually hooking with her.

  7. With Pedro and Henry on the Yong.Neil/Stacey thingy.

  8. You guys may have already been alerted, but Oni Press and Comixoloy have offered a Scott Pilgrim app for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad that will sell all six volumes. The first five volumes sell for $7, and the sixth sells for $12.

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